In pictures: Courtauld’s new Edvard Munch exhibition will reveal a dozen works never before seen in Britain

An exhibition opening today at the Courtauld Institute in London will show almost a dozen paintings by Edvard Munch that have never been seen by the British public.

The exhibition traces the Norwegian painter’s development since the 1880s through 18 key works on loan from Bergen’s KODE Art Museum, 11 of which have not been shown in Britain. highlights several themes key to Munch’s rise to fame.

In Summer night. inger on the beach (1889), for example, one of the painter’s first works to be exhibited, Munch marks a major shift toward conveying psychological nuance, a style that would define his work.

“This is an unprecedented opportunity to see major works from one of the world’s greatest collections of Edvard Munch paintings,” said show curator Barnaby Wright. “Visitors will find extraordinary, if less familiar, Munch’s seminal early paintings.”

Ultimately, the exhibition establishes a narrative that connects the trajectory of Munch’s career as a painter, beginning with Socialist Realism, Naturalism, and the legacy of French Impressionism, to visceral depictions of the psychological torment and trauma for which he would be known.

Included in the exhibition are numerous works from the “Frieze of Life” series, instantly recognizable for Munch’s rich use of color and composition that reflect the deeply emotional state of the subjects he portrays.

Ultimately, the show presents Munch as perhaps the greatest emo painter of all time (whether he impacted bands like My Chemical Romance is not mentioned in the curatorial text, however), and will offer British audiences a unique experience. -Lifetime opportunity to see many marquee masterpieces like mesoiree at karl johan (1892), Melancholia (1894-96), and By the deathbed (1895).

See images from the show below.

Edward Munch (1863-1944), on deathbed (1895). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, Self-portrait at the Clinic (1909). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, moonlight on the beach (1892). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, Melancholia (1894-96). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, Marie Helene Holmboe (1898). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, morning (1884). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, Nude in profile to the right (1894). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, Man and woman (1898). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection

Edward Munch, Inger in sun (1888). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, house in the moonlight (1893-95). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, Children playing in the street at Åsgårdstrand (1901-1903). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, Afternoon at Karl Johan (1892). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, four stages of life (1902). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

Edward Munch, bathing boys (1904-05). KODE Bergen Art Museum, Rasmus Meyer Collection.

“Edvard Munch. Bergen Masterpieces” is on display at Courtauld’s Denise Coates Exhibition Galleries and will be on view from May 27 to September 4, 2022.

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